The FPS is flashing red. Time for the genre to take cover & reload?

It feels like the First Person Shooter (FPS, and I do include 3rd person shooters too) is starting to show its limits. It might be controversial to say that the FPS genre has run out of steam but I’m not precluding that there is a market for shooters. I just see that as the gaming market matures and the technology behind it matures as well that the plain old FPS is starts to seem a bit limited, a bit shallow. What started as a game mechanic to best utilise limited technology is now being shown as limited by technology that’s advanced far enough to leave the concept in its wake.

Bang!

Bang, you’re dead! Seriously though, the FPS is in similar condition to Adams here.

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Copyright infringement off the port bow (why crying wolf should have an activation limit)

The following article is partly cannibalised from a post I wrote a number of years ago on the Infinity – Quest for Earth forums. If you haven’t seen or heard of Infinity, look it up. Why? Because a procedurally generated game with infinite content that maintains commonality by sharing algorithms with other game clients is a damn cool idea. That’s why. But I digress.

Game piracy is a pretty difficult and thorny issue which is rarely explored in much detail without resorting to oversimplification and emotive propaganda. So much so that just about any debate seems to descend to straw manning. In some of the more rational and measured analyses of the issue I’ve read there seem to be a few shared points that keep cropping up which I feel obliged to elaborate and comment on.

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You put ethics in my game?

The place of ethics in computer gaming is a topic I’ve been keen to cover for some time. While ‘moral panic’ has been a frequent occurrence in various attacks on the gaming industry and some high profile games in particular (Mass Effect sex scenes anyone?) ethics in gaming seem to have escaped much focus. This could be because morals invoke the religious right and FOX News while ethics require slightly more frontal lobe to process or engage with, but it feels like the time is ripe to examine gaming and the ethical experimentation it encourages. Computer games provide a fantastic psychological sandbox because unlike almost all other forms of entertainment media they are both participative and interactive. This allows and encourages some interesting psychological processes to be explored through them.

Some games provide a deeper ethical sandbox than others. In most first person shooters the player is forced along a path where they have little impact except to continue the story and you are simply killing or being killed. Roleplaying games (RPG’s) present a broader opportunity to observe human ethics unfettered by societal constraint, sanction or judgement. RPG’s have always offered the most obvious demonstration of ethics in gaming but only since they started embodying consequence has this gained much depth or interest. When your chaotic evil monk in Neverwinter Nights got the same ending as your lawful good paladin, choice in dealing with non player characters felt irrelevant except insofar as how you perceived your character. More recent games (Mass Effect leading the charge) have implemented lasting consequence making ethics in gaming deeper and more impactful. For the purposes of this article I’m focusing around the expression of ethics in single player gaming though multiplayer provides an interesting counterpart to be explored at a later date. Continue reading